Introducing: Death At Sea

It seems as if the UK music industry, and the power players within it, are constantly on the search for the “next great British guitar band” – something very likely fueled by a desire to return to the days of fifteen pound albums, Our Price, champagne supernovas and a hell of a lot of disposable income.

Bands that capture a specific moment in time, and are widely proclaimed as the voice of the general public, are record company gold dust. Indeed, many a new signing has been heralded as such, only to be found wanting when the time comes for the music, rather than the press hyperbole, to do the talking. True success stories – Franz Ferdinand, Arctic Monkeys, Kasabian, et al – are, of course, much harder to come by.

Next in line to run this gauntlet are Liverpool’s Death At Sea, a group of currently unsigned twenty-somethings from the Mersey who are harking back to the golden age of guitars with their fuzzy and upbeat indie. We’re reminded of the great bands of the 90s from both sides of the Atlantic when listening to “Sea Foam Green” and “Drag”, their two impressive online demos – everyone from Weezer to The Smashing Pumpkins to Suede to Blur. More recent comparisons might point to The Vaccines, Yuck or Surfer Blood, making DAS a very exciting prospect for fans of the six string.

Perhaps crucially, these songs are well formed, hook heavy and easily imaginable on a large stage at a summer festival – and one gets the feeling more where this came from might give this lot a fighting chance to get there, and eventually become mentioned in the same breath as some of their influences. We’ll be sure to check on their progress in London on 28 June, when they play their debut show in the capital at The Lexington.



Leave a Reply

Formatting: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Other Entries

Past LFC performance

MUMFORD AND SONS // OLD BLUE LAST // 24 OCT 2007